SC town official fired over Facebook post calling for shooting of George Floyd protesters | News


A city of Darlington employee has been fired after she posted on Facebook that protesters who have damaged property and looted businesses in recent days should be shot, imprisoned or taken off food stamps.

Former Darlington clerk of court Jonna Carter was fired Monday morning by City Administrator Howard Garland after her weekend post made waves in the town of nearly 6,000 people in South Carolina’s Pee Dee region. The post came amid a week of demonstrations nationwide after an unarmed black man in Minnesota died at the hands of police.

“Anyone protesting are obviously unhappy with their own life,” Carter wrote in a post that was shared with The Post and Courier. “… shoot their ass, lock them up, stop their food stamps… take their children… they are showing their true colors… I’m upset about what happened but I would not destroy someone’s property… they are a piece of s***!!!!”

Garland said city leaders were told of the post over the weekend and had Carter take it down. She was fired first thing Monday morning, Garland said.

“We apologize to anyone offended by these statement as they do not represent the city of Darlington, its values or it mission,” Garland said. “The city of Darlington does not condone violence or racism, period.”

Darlington Mayor Curtis Boyd said the post wasn’t aligned with his goal of making Darlington inviting to people of all different backgrounds.

“The post she put out was completely overboard and can’t be tolerated,” Boyd told The Post and Courier. “We have to stand up for what’s right.”

The post was unacceptable for a city employee, especially one who works in a justice system that has lost the faith of black Americans, said state Sen. Gerald Malloy, an African American attorney in Hartsville.

“You cannot tolerate it,” the veteran Democrat said. “It’s something that’s outrageous.”

Clerks of court are administrative employees that manage documents, distribute court orders, prepare meeting agendas and handle other secretarial duties for judges, attorneys and other court officers.

Carter worked closely with Judge Robert Stucks, an African American. The newspaper left a message with Stucks’ office Monday morning that hasn’t been returned.

Carter was sharing an NBC News story that reported protesters in Nashville had set the city’s historic courthouse and city hall on fire. Carter’s post has since disappeared from Facebook, along with her profile.

Darlington Police Chief Kelvin Washington declined to comment Monday morning, referring questions to Garland.

The home phone number listed for Carter appeared to have been disconnected.

Malloy said the U.S. Constitution’s free-speech protections don’t protect Carter’s employment with the city.

“You have a right to speak your mind,” Malloy said. “But you don’t have a right to your consequences.”

Garland said city leaders were told of the post over the weekend and had Carter take it down. She was fired first thing Monday morning, Garland said.

 “We apologies to anyone offended by these statement as they do not represent the city of Darlington, its values or it mission,” Garland said. “The city of Darlington does not condone violence or racism, period.”

Darlington Mayor Curtis Boyd said the post wasn’t aligned with his goal of making Darlington inviting to people of all different backgrounds.

“The post she put out was completely overboard and can’t be tolerated,” Boyd told The Post and Courier. “We have to stand up for what’s right.”

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Reach Avery Wilks at 803-374-3115. Follow him on Twitter at @AveryGWilks.





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