Internet

Republicans objecting to electoral votes in Congress: live updates


  • A joint session of Congress to count the 2020 presidential race’s Electoral College votes descended into chaos as violent protesters breached the Capitol building. 
  • The breach forced both chambers, which were separately debating an objection to Arizona’s Electoral Votes, to go into recess. Lawmakers had to shelter in places as protesters crowded the building. 
  • For the first time in American history, dozens of Republican lawmakers from both chambers planned to challenge multiple slates of electors under the Electoral Count Act. 
  • One member of the House and one member of the Senate must raise an objection for both chambers of Congress to separately debate and vote on whether to accept the electors. 
  • Follow along for live updates and watch the proceedings below. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A joint session of Congress led by Vice President Mike Pence to oversee the counting of slates of presidential electors descended into chaos when throngs on violent protesters descended on the US Captiol.

The protesters, which breached the Capitol as lawmakers were debating an objection to Arizona’s electoral votes, forced both chambers to go into recess and lawmakers to take shelter in their offices. 

In response to the violence, Washington, DC mayor Muriel Bowser ordered a 6 p.m. curfew in the District of Columbia. 

The event, which in most years is simply a procedural formality, holds particular significance in 2021 in further affirming President-elect Joe Biden’s victory in the presidential race after outgoing President Donald Trump and his allies spent two months attempting to overturn the 2020 election results.

READ  Apple changes British & Australian Siri voices on HomePod

Dozens of House lawmakers and 13 Republican Senators, as of Wednesday, were planning on raising objections to counting at least one and possibly multiple slates of electors under the Electoral Count Act of 1887, which permits lawmakers to raise objections to specific states’ electors.

Biden won 306 Electoral College votes compared to 232 for Trump. 

Politico reported on Tuesday that lawmakers from both chambers have garnered the most support for objections to slates of Biden electors from Arizona, Georgia, and Pennsylvania, with challenges to other states still on the table. 

One member of the House and one member of the Senate must raise an objection for both chambers of Congress to separately debate for a maximum of two hours and vote on whether to accept the electors. Both chambers must each vote by simple majority to reject it. 

Democrats control the House and Republicans temporarily hold a narrow majority in the Senate. With 20 GOP senators publicly stating that they support the Electoral College results and do not plan to object to electoral votes, any challenges are virtually guaranteed to fail.

Read more: Here’s what the Georgia Senate results mean for voting rights, cannabis, and $2,000 stimulus checks

Follow along for live updates and watch the proceedings below:

 



READ SOURCE

Leave a Reply

This website uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you accept our use of cookies.