Tech reviews

Hyundai Ioniq 5 electric car 2022 review: RWD – Can this breakthrough EV fulfill a family’s needs?


For storage you’ll get two cupholders in the front, and no centre storage bin. There’s a large shelf instead which I find more useful and there’s a shelf for keys and a phone, plus a wireless charger.

You do get a larger glove box if you want to store things away and there are bottle holders in each door. 

For storage you’ll get two cupholders in the front. (image credit: Dean McCartney) For storage you’ll get two cupholders in the front. (image credit: Dean McCartney)

There are power adjustable seats in both rows, and the kids were so excited they could move their seats with buttons, too.

That’s certainly a novelty in the backseat so it scored big points with them. The front seats are heated and ventilated, and the outer rear seats are heated.

The front seats are heated and ventilated. (image credit: Dean McCartney) The front seats are heated and ventilated. (image credit: Dean McCartney)

Rear passengers also get their own air vents, two cupholders in the centre armrest and storage in the doors. 

There are power adjustable seats in both rows. (image credit: Dean McCartney) There are power adjustable seats in both rows. (image credit: Dean McCartney)

Now for the electric motor. How does the charging work?

That depends on where you charge it. If you’re charging it at one of those AC outlets at a supermarket, it will take six hours to go from 10 to 80 per cent.

If you’re at a speedier 50kWh charger, it will take around one hour. And speedier still, but much rarer, a 350kWh charger takes 18 minutes. If you’re just plugging into a power point it will take 31 hours. 

The battery life is impressive, though, with a 451km range, and if you’re doing city driving that range is extended because of the regenerative braking.

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When I picked the car up at the beginning of the week I had a 393km range, and I didn’t need to charge it over the seven days I drove, doing mainly suburban driving.

I didn’t even get range anxiety because the battery was going down so slowly. I averaged 17kWh/100km and when I returned the car after seven days I still had around 240km range left. 



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