Tech reviews

2022 Mitsubishi Outlander revealed and ready to challenge CR-V, RAV4


This looks… really great, actually.


Mitsubishi

Yes, Mitsubishi still sells cars in America. No, it’s not going away. The 2022 Mitsubishi Outlander is a clear statement the Japanese brand is here to stay, and honestly, it looks pretty darn good. The brand revealed the next-generation compact SUV on Tuesday via Amazon Live, and although it’s an extensive collaboration between the Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi Alliance, this is all Mitsu, all the time.


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Seriously, the 2022 Outlander doesn’t share a thing with the outgoing SUV, and although it does become a kissing cousin with the 2021 Nissan Rogue, the brand promises it sweated the details when it comes to ride quality and associated tuning. The new partner platform Mitsubishi uses for the latest Outlander fits a standard 2.5-liter inline-four engine and the company’s Super All-Wheel Control AWD system is on the menu. Outlanders fitted with the AWD system receive a six-mode drive selector to fine-tune AWD prowess to whatever elements drivers encounter. However, those who opt for a front-wheel drive model get a drive selector, too. It comes with five selectable modes instead, but Mitsubishi didn’t detail them further. As for a new Outlander PHEV, Mitsubishi isn’t quite there yet.

Now, about the new Outlander’s looks: I think they’re really, really great. The front fascia pulls a lot from the Engelberg Tourer concept shown a couple years ago and wears an upright and taut jawline really well. Mitsubishi calls it the “Dynamic Shield” face, which is supposed to accentuate muscular fenders. At any rate, if there is a Nissan Rogue under there, you certainly wouldn’t know it. The rear also sticks to the Engelberg Tourer concept pretty well with slim, long taillights, a chunky D-pillar, floating roofline and identical tailgate design. A set of 20-inch wheels are shown, though 18-inch wheels are standard. Hindsight is 20/20, but clearly, we were looking at the 2022 Outlander years ago with the Engelberg Tourer.

Mitsu still has game.


Mitsubishi

Moving to the cockpit, it genuinely looks pretty marvelous, especially after years of rather dull interiors from the brand. The company showed two different interior styles and both look mighty fine. The first is a darker look with black upholstery and screamin’ tangerine accents. I haven’t sat in this SUV, but it’s already easy to see how much better the 2022 model will be. At least from the photos, it looks like designers spent time on putting quality materials in the right place. I also really dig the diamond accents that extend to the door panels.

The other design shows a gray and white color scheme that, again, looks like it punches well above anything Mitsubishi crafted in the last five years or so. There’s likely a reason Mitsubishi calls the Outlander its “flagship.” And if we can’t have a Lancer Evolution anymore, I’ll take quality cockpits, at least.

On the technology front, Mitsu includes a 9-inch infotainment screen in the center of the dashboard. Sleek HVAC vents split it from physical buttons and knobs below. Hallelujah for the fact the infotainment screen also features physical knobs. Ahead of the driver is an optional 12.3-inch driver display that houses all the essential dashboard functions. It’s not clear what the standard outfit looks like just yet, but at least in top spec, the 2022 Outlander looks quite tech-filled. Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, a 10.8-inch head-up display in full color and wireless phone charging are along for the ride too, technophiles.

The Roadshow staff are all eager to drive the latest Outlander because it looks really darn good so far. We won’t have too long to wait, and you won’t have long before they’re sitting at local dealerships. The new SUV goes on sale this April with a starting price of $26,990 after a $1,195 destination charge. 



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